As we previously discussed in Medical Marijuana 103: Patient and Practitioner Regulations in New York State, practitioners in New York must be registered with the New York State Department of Health (“DOH”) in order to certify patients for medical marijuana use. The DOH maintains a list of registered practitioners on its website, however such list is woefully incomplete. As of the date of this writing there are over 1,360 providers statewide that are registered to certify patients for medical marijuana, but only 32 percent are included on the public list maintained by the DOH.

On Wednesday, November 28, 2017, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill which requires the the DOH to list on its website all practitioners who are certified to recommend medical marijuana to patients.

Sen. Diane Savino (D-Staten Island), the primary sponsor of the bill, stated that one of the biggest complaints from patients in the medical marijuana program was finding a registered doctor.

“People complained that it was difficult to find a doctor near them so they could  be certified as a patient. Because the Department of Health kept the list proprietary, it made it that much harder for patients,” said Senator Savino.

A vote on the bill was held in June 2017, with 62 senators voting in favor of the bill and only 1 senator opposing it. The bill requires that the name, contact information, and other information relating to practitioners registered with the DOH to certify patients for medical marijuana be public information and that the information be maintained on the DOH’s website in searchable form. There is an exception, however – practitioners may still opt-out if they do not wish for their information to be public by informing the DOH in writing. The new requirements will be implemented sixty (60) days after the bill was signed into law by Governor Cuomo.

Sen. Savino was also the main proponent of the bill signed on November 11, 2017 by the Governor which adds post traumatic stress disorder to the list of qualifying conditions treatable with medical marijuana in New York State. The date on which the bill was signed into law is no coincidence, as veterans groups in particular had urged Governor Cuomo to allow those with PTSD to use medical marijuana. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, about eight million adults suffer from PTSD in any given year, including tens of thousands of Afghanistan and Iraq veterans. Somewhere between 11% and 20% of those vets will suffer from it each year.

Everyone involved, or thinking about becoming involved, in the cannabis business is aware of the conflict between the laws of those states legalizing marijuana and the Controlled Substance Act (the “CSA”).  The CSA is a federal law making it illegal to manufacture, distribute or dispense a controlled substance.  For purposes of the CSA, marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance – making it illegal under federal law to be engaged in the marijuana business regardless of what state law provides.

The obvious consequence of this conflict of laws is the potential for federal prosecution for engaging in the marijuana business.  However, the not-so-obvious practical consequences reach further than you might think.  For example,

  • Taxes. Section 280E of the Internal Revenue Code, originally targeted for illegal drug dealers, prohibits cannabis businesses from deducting typical business expenses, such as advertising and rent.
  • Leases.  Most leases have covenants against “illegal activity,” which enables landlords to evict marijuana business tenants.  Moreover, many landlords are unwilling to rent to marijuana businesses, despite their legality under state law, for fear of losing their property in a federal civil asset forfeiture action.
  • Banking. In 2014 the Department of Treasury issued guidance for financial institutions that want to do business with the marijuana industry.  Up until that time, banks were reluctant to deal with the marijuana business due to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), which requires banks to investigate their customers and to refrain from negligently or knowingly doing business with bad actors.  Today, banks are safe if they follow some pretty onerous rules.  Many banks choose not do business with the industry rather than comply with the diligence and monitoring requirements set forth by the Department of Treasury.
  • Commercial loans. Commercial loans are difficult to obtain without providing collateral; however, in a marijuana business, banks are not allowed to seize or possess the primary asset of a marijuana business – the marijuana – under federal law. Often a marijuana business will not have many other assets that are valuable enough to act as security for financing.
  • Trademarks. Because marijuana is illegal under the CSA, and because the United States Patent and Trademark Office will not register a mark if the applicant cannot show lawful use of the mark in commerce, it is nearly impossible to secure federal registration of a marijuana-related mark (although marks for ancillary products might be obtained).
  • Federal Water. Many areas in the western United States are served by the Federal Bureau of Reclamation, which manages water and power to farmers.  The Bureau has advised that it will report to the Department of Justice any marijuana farmers who use federal water to irrigate their crops.
  • Bankruptcy. At least two courts have held that marijuana businesses cannot take advantage of federal bankruptcy laws.  The rationale is that, because marijuana is illegal under federal law, granting relief under another provision of federal law for the same activity would be “administering the fruits and instrumentalities of Federal criminal activity.”
  • Access to Federal Courts. If you enter into a contract with a marijuana business and need to sue in federal court, will you be able to?  This question has yet to be answered; however, if the prohibition against bankruptcy relief serves as guidance, the outcome is likely not favorable to marijuana businesses.

It is clear that federal law creates many obstacles to establishing and effectively managing a marijuana business.  Those in the industry should plan carefully and seek legal advice as to how to best mitigate the risks arising from the conflict between state and federal laws.

In our previous post, Medical Marijuana 103: Patient and Practitioner Regulations in New York State, we discussed that patients certified for medical marijuana use can designate up to two caregivers. Caregivers can assist patients who are unable to pick up medical marijuana at a dispensing facility or are unable to administer medical marijuana to themselves properly.

Previously the Medical Marijuana Program only allowed for designated caregivers to be natural persons. On October 5, 2017, however, the New York State Department of Health (“DOH”) issued emergency regulations that expand the definition of caregiver to allow certain facilities to be designated caregivers. By expanding the definition in this way, patients who are located in or reside at certain facilities can designate their facility as their caregiver, thus making it easier for such patients to obtain medical marijuana.

The new regulations define a designated caregiver as either a natural person or a facility. The term “facility” is further defined as, among others, hospitals, adult day care facilities, community mental health residences, and private and public schools. In addition, each division, department, component, floor or other unit of a parent facility may be designated as a “facility” for purposes of being designated a caregiver.

Just like natural persons, facilities will need to register with the DOH in order to be designated a caregiver for purposes of the Medical Marijuana Program. Once registered with the DOH facilities will be authorized to lawfully possess, acquire, deliver, transfer, transport and/or administer medical marijuana to certified patients residing in, or attending, that facility.

The DOH considered alternatives prior to issuing the emergency regulations, stating:

The Department could have chosen to keep the status quo and not allow patients to designate facilities as designated caregivers. The Department could have also allowed certified patients to designate an individual within the facility to be a caregiver. However, these options are not viable since patients in facilities may be cared for by multiple staff members in the course of a day. Certified patients have severe debilitating or life-threatening conditions and the regulatory amendments would help to prevent adverse events associated with abrupt discontinuation of a treatment alternative that may be providing relief for certified patients in these facilities.”

The regulations were published in the New York State Register on October 25, 2017. The DOH will accept comments from the public for a minimum of 45 days following the date of publication. After publication in the Register and receipt of public comment, the agency may either adopt, revise or withdraw the proposal. This change is just one of the latest revisions implemented by the DOH in an attempt to strengthen and expand New York’s struggling Medical Marijuana Program.

This blog post is the fifth in a series of articles discussing the current state of the law in New York regarding medical marijuana. To read the latest post in the series, Medical Marijuana 104: Responsibilities of Health Insurers, click here.

As you may recall from our first post in this series, medical marijuana in New York was legalized through the passage of the New York Compassionate Care Act (“CCA”) in 2014. The CCA also created new anti-discrimination protections for medical marijuana users. Namely, the CCA provides that patients who are certified for medical marijuana use shall not be subject to “disciplinary action by a business” for exercising their rights to use medical marijuana. The CCA further provides that being a certified patient is the equivalent of having a disability for purposes of the New York State Human Rights Law (“NYSHRL”).

Together the CCA and NYSHRL provide that New York employers with four or more employees are prohibited from terminating or refusing to employ an individual on the basis of his/her status as a certified medical marijuana patient. In addition, employers must provide reasonable accommodations to certified patients as a result of his or her disability. Accordingly, an employer may be subject to a discrimination claim if it fires or disciplines an employee for lawfully consuming marijuana under the CCA.

The CCA does contain two exceptions to the above general rules. First, the CCA does “not bar the enforcement of [an employer’s] policy prohibiting an employee from performing his or her employment duties while impaired by a controlled substance.” Second, the Act does “not require any person or entity to do any act that would put the person or entity in violation of federal law or cause it to lose a federal contract or funding.”

The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), which became law in 1990, is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else.

Marijuana in any form and for any use is illegal at the federal level under the Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”). The ADA provides that a person’s illegal use of drugs is grounds for denying employment or firing from employment. The ADA defines “illegal use of drugs” as follows: “the use of drugs, the possession or distribution of which is unlawful under the Controlled Substances Act. Such term does not include the use of a drug taken under supervision by a licensed health care professional, or other uses authorized by the Controlled Substances Act or other provisions of Federal law.”

For the most parts court have, to date, agreed that, because the CSA does not allow medicinal use of marijuana, a medical professional cannot legally, as a matter of federal law, supervise medical marijuana use so as to bring an employee under the ADA’s protection. See, e.g., James v. City of Costa Mesa, 2010 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 53009, at *8-11 (C.D. Cal. Apr. 30, 2010); Barber v. Gonzales, 2005 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 37411, at *2-5 (E.D. Wash. July 1, 2005); Johnson v. Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., 2009 WL 865308, at *4 (Mont. Mar. 31, 2009).

Case law in this area is developing and uncertainty remains as state laws clash with federal requirements.

In 2015, for example, the Colorado Supreme Court unanimously held that employers may still terminate employees who use medical marijuana – even though medical marijuana use is specifically authorized by the Colorado Constitution and Colorado law protects employees’ lawful off-duty conduct.  The Court held that marijuana use (whether for medicinal or recreational use) remains unlawful under federal law and therefore medical marijuana use cannot be deemed “lawful” under the state’s off-duty conduct law.

On the other hand, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court provided that the plaintiff, a patient who qualified for the medical use of marijuana and had been terminated from her employment because she tested positive for marijuana, could seek a civil remedy against her employer through claims of handicap discrimination in violation of Massachusetts laws.

Similarly, the Superior Court of Rhode Island in 2017 held that an employer’s enforcement of its neutral drug testing policy to deny employment to an applicant because she held a medical marijuana card violated the anti-discrimination provisions of the state medical marijuana law.

In New York, the Taxi & Limousine Commission (“TLC”) filed a petition seeking the revocation of the respondent taxi driver’s TLC Driver License because the driver tested positive for marijuana. New York City’s Office of Administrative Trials & Hearings (“OATH”) disagreed and recommended that the petition be dismissed, finding that revocation solely because of the driver’s status as a certified medical marijuana patient would violate New York City and State laws.  The TLC adopted the OATH decision.

In our next post we’re going to continue our review of important parties that play a role in the medical marijuana industry. To be sure not to miss the article when it comes out we invite you to subscribe to the Farrell Fritz New York Health Law Blog.

This blog post is the third in a series of articles discussing the current state of the law in New York regarding medical marijuana. To read the latest post in the series, Medical Marijuana 102: NYS Registered Organizations and Dispensaries, click here.

In today’s post we’re going to be reviewing the requirements imposed by New York’s Medical Marijuana Program upon patients and certifying practitioners. As of August 22, 2017, 1,184 practitioners have registered with the NYS Department of Health (“DOH”) for the purpose of certifying patients for medical marijuana use and 28,077 patients have been certified for such use.

The DOH authorizes physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants to certify patients for medical marijuana use. As we mentioned in Medical Marijuana 101, New York’s Medical Marijuana Program is available only to patients who suffer from one of the following severe, debilitating or life-threatening conditions: cancer, positive status for HIV or AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, neuropathy, chronic pain, or Huntington’s disease. Patients must also have one of the following associated or complicating conditions: cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe or chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, or severe or persistent muscle spasms.

Practitioners who wish to certify patients to use medical marijuana must meet four general criteria. First, the practitioner must be qualified to treat patients who suffer from one or more of the serious conditions listed above.

Second, the practitioner must be either (1) a licensed physician who is in good standing as a physician and practicing medicine in New York State, (2) a certified nurse practitioner who is in good standing as a nurse practitioner and practicing in New York State, or (3) a licensed physician assistant who is in good standing as a physician assistant and practicing in New York State under the supervision of a physician registered with the New York State Medical Marijuana Program.

Third, the practitioner must have completed a four-hour course approved by the NYS Health Commissioner. The course must include the following course content: the pharmacology of marihuana; contraindications; side effects; adverse reactions; overdose prevention; drug interactions; dosing; routes of administration; risks and benefits; warnings and precautions; abuse and dependence; and such other components as determined by the commissioner. Currently the Commissioner has only approved two providers, TheAnswerPage and The Medical Cannabis Institute, to offer the course. The course is available to all interested parties, meaning that you can take the course even if you are not in the medical field and/or not looking to certify patients for medical marijuana use.

Lastly, the practitioner must have registered with the DOH. Practitioners can only register with the DOH if they’ve taken the four-hour course. Once a practitioner has completed the registration process they will then have access to the Medical Marijuana Data Management System which will allow them to issue certifications to qualifying patients.

Qualifying patients suffering from the severe illnesses listed above can learn more about whether medical marijuana may help them by speaking with a practitioner that is registered with the program. To help patients locate a registered practitioner, the DOH keeps an updated list of registered practitioners on its website.

Once patients are certified by a registered practitioner for medical marijuana use, patients must register with the DOH by, among other things, providing documentation to prove their identity and NYS residency. When patients register with the DOH they can also designate up to two caregivers. Those caregivers must also register with the DOH using the same online system as the one used by patients. Pursuant to the Compassionate Care Act there is a $50 application fee but the DOH is currently waiving the $50 fee for all patients and their designated caregivers.

Once a patient or caregiver’s registration is processed, the DOH mails a registry ID card directly to the patient or caregiver. Registrations expire when the certification that was issued by the practitioner expires. At this time, New York State does not accept certifications or registry ID cards from other states. This is not unusual as there are currently only three states (Nevada, Hawaii and Maine) that practice full reciprocity and will legally allow, under certain circumstances, out-of-state patients to make purchases at licensed dispensaries.

Now that we’ve learned about the basic regulations covering patients and practitioners we’re going to turn our attention to other important parties that play a role in the medical marijuana industry. Check back soon for Medical Marijuana 104: Responsibilities of Health Insurers. To be sure not to miss the article when it comes out, we invite you to subscribe to the Farrell Fritz New York Health Law Blog.

This blog post is the second in a series of articles discussing the current state of the law in New York regarding medical marijuana. To read the first post in the series, Medical Marijuana 101: The State of the Law in NY, click here.

One of the biggest questions that people have when discussing medical marijuana in New York is where can patients obtain medical marijuana products.

Before a patient can obtain medical marijuana products, he or she must first be issued a certification for medical marijuana by a practitioner, who is registered with the NYS Department of Health’s Medical Marijuana Program, and obtain a Registry Identification Card. Patients can then use that Registry Identification Card to visit a dispensing facility to obtain medical marijuana products. We’ll dive into the requirements imposed upon patients and certifying physicians in our next post and concentrate today on registered organizations and dispensaries.

Registered organizations are responsible for the manufacturing and dispensing of medical marijuana in New York State. At the time that the medical marijuana program was launched in 2016, New York approved five registered organizations: Columbia Care NY LLC, Etain, LLC, MedMen, Inc. (formerly known as Bloomfield Industries Inc.), PharmaCann LLC and Vireo Health of New York LLC (formerly known as Empire State Health Solutions).

On August 1, 2017, the NYS Department of Health announced that it has licensed five new companies to join the original five: Valley Agriceuticals, LLC, Citiva Medical LLC, PalliaTech NY, LLC, NYCanna LLC and Fiorello Pharmaceutics, Inc.

Valley Agriceuticals and Citiva are authorized to bring dispensaries to Brooklyn, Pallia and NYCanna are expected to open somewhere in Queens, and Fiorello Pharmaceutics is authorized to open a dispensary in Manhattan. Each of the new registered organizations received authority to open dispensing facilities in other delineated areas of New York as well. Under the Compassionate Care Act, each registered organization is authorized to have up to four dispensing facilities, meaning that there could be up to forty dispensing facilities statewide if each registered organization is fully developed.

Registered organizations must manufacture medical marijuana products in an indoor, enclosed, secure facility located in New York State and may only manufacture medical marijuana products in forms approved by the Commissioner of Health. These forms include liquid or oil preparations for metered oromucosal or sublingual administration or administration per tube; metered liquid or oil preparations for vaporization; and capsules for oral administration. Smoking, as of now, is not an approved route of administration. On August 10, 2017, the NYS Department of Health proposed broadening the acceptable forms to include ointments, patches, lozenges and chewable tablets.

A certified patient can go to any dispensing facility of a registered organization in New York. This provides greater options to patients as not every dispensing facility sells the same types of medical marijuana. There are currently two New York State-mandated products for medical marijuana which require set ratios of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), the two main chemicals used in manufacturing medical marijuana. Those two products must be offered by each registered organization, but a registered organization may also offer other products at the dispensing facility that have varying ratios of THC to CBD. It is expected that other products will be offered over time.

In addition, certified patients who are unable to go to a dispensing facility may designate a caregiver who can go for them. Registered organizations are also permitted to offer delivery services to patients and designated caregivers to help expand access to those who are unable to travel to a dispensing facility.

As you might imagine, dispensing facilities are subject to a number of regulations in order to ensure that patient health is properly protected. Among other requirements, dispensing facilities must (1) have a licensed NYS pharmacist on site to directly supervise the facility when open, (2) not sell items other than medical marijuana products approved by the NYS Department of Health, (3) not allow the consumption of the medical marijuana by the patient at the facility, (4) not allow certified patients or their caregivers to consume any food or beverages at the facility unless necessary for medical reasons, (5) maintain a visitor log, and (6) firmly affix a patient-specific dispensing label approved by the Department of Health that is easily readable and includes a delineated list of items. The regulations allow dispensaries to provide up to a 30-day supply of medical marijuana to a certified patient.

Dispensing facilities, as well as the manufacturing facilities operated by registered organizations, must also meet a number of security regulations. Registered organizations must also provide an electronic report to the NYS Department of Health of all approved medical marijuana products that are dispensed within 24 hours after the medical marijuana was dispensed to the certified patient or designated caregiver.

Now that we have a basic understanding of registered organizations and dispensing facilities, check back soon for Medical Marijuana 103: Patient and Physician Regulations in New York State.

This blog post will be the first in a series of articles discussing the current state of the law in New York regarding medical marijuana.

There’s no denying that one of the hottest topics in health care law these days is the constant evolution of the state of the law as it relates to the use of marijuana. As of the date of this article, 29 states and the District of Columbia authorize the use of medical marijuana and 12 additional states have legislation pending that would likewise authorize the use of medical marijuana. In addition, 10 states and the District of Columbia have adopted more expansive laws legalizing marijuana for recreational use.

In 2014, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed the Compassionate Care Act authorizing the use of medical marijuana in the state of New York. The Medical Marijuana Program created under the Compassionate Care Act officially launched on January 7, 2016. Since its launch the New York State Department of Health (the “DOH”), tasked with regulating the program, has continued to expand the program.

Medical marijuana in New York is currently available to those suffering symptoms caused by eleven severe debilitating or life-threatening condition(s), including, but not limited to, cancer, HIV/AIDs, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, chronic pain and multiple sclerosis.

The Commissioner of the DOH has authority to expand the list of conditions that qualify for medical marijuana and has done so in the past, adding chronic pain as a qualifying condition in December 2016. Most recently, in June 2017, a bill to expand New York State’s medical marijuana program to cover sufferers of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) passed both houses of the New York State Legislature. It is expected that Governor Cuomo will receive the bill for consideration later this summer, although he has not yet indicated whether or not he will approve the bill.

Senators in New York have also introduced New York Senate Bill S01747, also known as the “marijuana regulation and taxation act.” The bill seeks to regulate the growth, taxation, and distribution of recreational marijuana in an attempt to generate a new source of revenue for the state.

The bill, among other items, allows for the growing and use of marijuana by persons eighteen years of age or older, the licensure of persons authorized to produce, process and sell marijuana, the levy of an excise tax on certain sales of marijuana and the repeal of certain provisions of the penal law relating to the criminal sale of marijuana. The bill proposes that regulatory oversight would be maintained by the New York State Liquor Authority. On January 6, 2016 the Bill was referred to the Senate Finance Committee and as of the date of the writing of this article remains pending there.

Check back soon for Medical Marijuana 102: Dispensaries where we’ll dive in a little deeper to explain the regulations surrounding how patients in New York can become certified for medical marijuana use and the dispensaries that make that use possible.