Physicians and Other Licensed Professionals

The New York State Department of Labor (the “DOL”) issued an emergency regulation clarifying its minimum-wage rules regarding home care employees. The emergency regulation provides that sleep and meal times for home care aides who work shifts of 24 hours or more are not counted as hours worked. Recently, there has been a ringing dissonance between the DOL and decisions set forth by the New York State Appellate Divisions, First and Second Departments, regarding whether home care workers should be paid for an entire 24-hour shift, including sleep and meal time. In fact, the DOL expressly cited the fact that the emergency regulation is being promulgated in direct reaction to decisions issued by the New York State Appellate Divisions. For reference, the decisions triggering the emergency regulation are: Moreno v. Future Care Health Servs., Inc., 2017 N.Y. App. Div. LEXIS 6462 (2d Dept Sept. 13, 2017); (2d Dep’t Sept. 13, 2017); Andreyeyeva v. New York Health Care, Inc., 2017 N.Y. App. Div. LEXIS 6408 (2d Dep’t Sept. 13, 2017); and Tokhtaman v. Human Care, LLC, 149 A.D.3d 476 (1st Dep’t Apr. 11, 2017).

The above-referenced decisions effectively flipped the New York home care industry on its head, each holding, in sum, that home care workers were entitled to pay for all 24 hours worked, including sleep and meal time. Enter the DOL, on October 5, 2017, who quickly put any remaining ambiguity to rest once and for all stating “that hours worked may exclude meal periods and sleep times for home care aides who work shifts of 24 hours or more”. The DOL reasoned that “[t]his regulation is needed to preserve the status quo, prevent the collapse of the homecare industry, and avoid institutionalizing patients who could be cared for at home, in the face of recent decisions by the State Appellate divisions that treat meal periods and sleep time [as hours worked]”.

The emergency regulation is expected to return the home care industry back to normalcy and prevent home care agencies from ceasing to provide “vital, lifesaving care” to thousands of New Yorkers who depend on it. The DOL explained that this “emergency adoption amends the relevant regulations to codify the Commissioner’s longstanding and consistent interpretations that such meal periods and sleep times do not constitute hours worked for purposes of minimum wage and overtime requirements”. And so, the longstanding rule about sleeping on the job still stands: you won’t get paid for it in New York.

Note:  Special thanks to our law clerk, Nicholas G. Moneta, for his assistance in drafting this blog post.

In our previous post, Medical Marijuana 103: Patient and Practitioner Regulations in New York State, we discussed that patients certified for medical marijuana use can designate up to two caregivers. Caregivers can assist patients who are unable to pick up medical marijuana at a dispensing facility or are unable to administer medical marijuana to themselves properly.

Previously the Medical Marijuana Program only allowed for designated caregivers to be natural persons. On October 5, 2017, however, the New York State Department of Health (“DOH”) issued emergency regulations that expand the definition of caregiver to allow certain facilities to be designated caregivers. By expanding the definition in this way, patients who are located in or reside at certain facilities can designate their facility as their caregiver, thus making it easier for such patients to obtain medical marijuana.

The new regulations define a designated caregiver as either a natural person or a facility. The term “facility” is further defined as, among others, hospitals, adult day care facilities, community mental health residences, and private and public schools. In addition, each division, department, component, floor or other unit of a parent facility may be designated as a “facility” for purposes of being designated a caregiver.

Just like natural persons, facilities will need to register with the DOH in order to be designated a caregiver for purposes of the Medical Marijuana Program. Once registered with the DOH facilities will be authorized to lawfully possess, acquire, deliver, transfer, transport and/or administer medical marijuana to certified patients residing in, or attending, that facility.

The DOH considered alternatives prior to issuing the emergency regulations, stating:

The Department could have chosen to keep the status quo and not allow patients to designate facilities as designated caregivers. The Department could have also allowed certified patients to designate an individual within the facility to be a caregiver. However, these options are not viable since patients in facilities may be cared for by multiple staff members in the course of a day. Certified patients have severe debilitating or life-threatening conditions and the regulatory amendments would help to prevent adverse events associated with abrupt discontinuation of a treatment alternative that may be providing relief for certified patients in these facilities.”

The regulations were published in the New York State Register on October 25, 2017. The DOH will accept comments from the public for a minimum of 45 days following the date of publication. After publication in the Register and receipt of public comment, the agency may either adopt, revise or withdraw the proposal. This change is just one of the latest revisions implemented by the DOH in an attempt to strengthen and expand New York’s struggling Medical Marijuana Program.

Few, if any, in the medical industry are unfamiliar with the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (“AKS”).  Under AKS, those giving or receiving compensation for referrals for items or services reimbursed by the federal healthcare programs are subject to criminal prosecution.  The statute is intended to prevent exploitation of the federal healthcare system, avoid unnecessary inflation of program costs and encourage fair competition in the industry.

AKS prohibits, among other things, the knowing and willful payment or receipt of any form of compensation to induce or reward referrals involving any item or service payable by federal healthcare programs.  “Federal healthcare programs” include more than just Medicare and Medicaid – “any plan or program providing health care benefits, whether directly through insurance or otherwise, that is funded directly, in whole or part, by the United States government (other than the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program), or any state health care program” is included.  This means that remuneration for referrals in connection with items and services that are reimbursable under TRICARE, the Veterans Administration, Federal Employees’ Compensation Act, and block grant programs are all subject to prosecution under AKS.

 

Where items or services are not reimbursable by a federal healthcare program, providers and referring parties are not subject to AKS prosecution.  However, due to an emerging trend in prosecution, the absence of reimbursement from federal healthcare programs should no longer leave providers and referral sources with a sense of security that they cannot be prosecuted for kickback arrangements.

 

Prosecutors are increasingly bringing charges against payers and recipients of remuneration for referrals in the medical arena under the Travel Act.  The Travel Act criminalizes the use of the United States mail and interstate or foreign travel for the purpose of engaging in certain specified criminal acts.  The Travel Act typically enforces two categories of state laws – laws prohibiting commercial bribery (i.e. corrupt dealings to secure an advantage over business competitors) and laws addressing illegal remuneration, including specific provisions regarding improper payments in connection with referral for services.

 

In two very recent high profile cases, prosecutors brought charges against those allegedly involved in kickback schemes under the both AKS and the Travel Act – Biodiagnostic Laboratory Services in New Jersey and Forest Park Medical Center in Texas.  Both cases have resulted in several plea bargains, yet both have charges under AKS and the Travel Act that are still pending.  While no court has directly ruled on the merits of prosecuting kickback schemes for medical services and items under the Travel Act, it is noteworthy that, in the Forest Park Medical Center case, the charges under the Travel Act survived a motion to dismiss at the district court level just last month.

 

All parties involved in referral arrangements for medical items or services should be on heightened alert as a result of this development.  Whereas AKS can only be used to prosecute parties to a kickback arrangement where federal healthcare program funds are at issue, the use of the Travel Act may broaden prosecutors’ reach to the private payor sector, even where federal healthcare programs are not involved.

Trypanophobia—the fear of needles—played a significant role in a case brought against Rite Aid Pharmacy under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In Stevens v. Rite Aid Corp., the Second Circuit overturned a jury verdict awarding substantial damages to a Rite Aid pharmacist who was terminated after he said he could not perform immunization injections because of a needle phobia.

In 2011, Rite Aid and other large pharmacy chains started requiring pharmacists to perform immunizations to fill an unmet need for vaccinations in the healthcare market. Rite Aid revised its pharmacist job description to include immunizations as one of the essential duties and responsibilities for pharmacists and required that each pharmacist hold a valid immunization permit.

Pharmacist Christopher Stevens asserted that his needle phobia was a disability under the ADA and sought a reasonable accommodation so that he would not have to perform immunizations.  Rite Aid responded that the ADA did not apply to trypanophobia, no reasonable accommodation was required, and he would be fired if he did not complete immunization training. When Stevens advised Rite Aid he could not complete the training, he was terminated for refusing to perform customer immunizations, an essential function of his job.

The Second Circuit first noted that, under the ADA, an employee must be qualified to perform the essential functions of his job, with or without reasonable accommodation. Even viewing all evidence in the light most favorable to Stevens, the Court held that immunization injections were an essential job requirement for Rite Aid pharmacists. The company made a business decision to require pharmacists to perform immunizations, revised its job description to require immunization certification and licensure, and included immunizations in the list of “essential duties and responsibilities” for Rite Aid pharmacists. The Court found jury sympathy for Stevens’s phobia to be understandable, but held that “his inability to perform an essential function of his job as a pharmacist is the only conclusion that could be drawn from the evidence.”

The Court next determined that Stevens had not established that Rite Aid could have provided a reasonable accommodation, emphasizing that the issue was whether a reasonable accommodation would have allowed Stevens to perform the essential function of immunization, not whether he could perform his other non-immunization duties as a pharmacist.

The Second Circuit reversed the judgment in favor of Stevens, holding that performing immunization injections was an essential job requirement, and Stevens presented no evidence of a reasonable accommodation that would have allowed him to do them.

The Stevens case highlights two important points under the ADA. An employer’s written job description including the essential duties and responsibilities of a position can be strong evidence to support an ADA argument concerning the essential functions of the job. Moreover, a reasonable accommodation is directed to allowing the employee to perform the essential functions of the job, not simply finding other things that the employee can do.

In our July 10, 2017 post, Concierge Medicine – Is it for you?, we cautioned that Medicare compliance concerns do not fall away when moving to a concierge or direct-pay model.  HHS has determined that concierge-style agreements are permitted as long as Medicare requirements are not violated.  Unless a physician has opted out of Medicare, the predominant requirement is that an access or membership fee cannot be charged to a Medicare patient for services that are already covered by Medicare.  But how does a concierge physician know where to draw the line?  The relevant authorities have issued very limited guidance in this area.

In March 2004, an OIG Alert was issued reminding Medicare participating providers that they may not charge Medicare patients fees for services already covered by Medicare.  OIG used, as an example, a case involving physician’s charge of $600 for a “Personal Health Care Medical Care Contract” that covered, among other things, coordination of care with other providers, a comprehensive assessment and plan for optimum health, and extra time spent on patient care.  Because some of these services were already reimbursable by Medicare, the physician was found to be in violation of his assignment agreement and was subjected to civil money penalties.  The physician entered into a settlement with OIG and was required to stop offering these contracts.

In 2007, OIG settled another case involving a physician engaged in a concierge-style practice.  There, the physician, who also had not opted out of Medicar, asked his patients to enter into a contract under which the patients paid an annual fee. Under the contract, the patient was to be provided with an annual comprehensive physical examination, coordination of referrals and expedited referrals, if medically necessary, and other service amenities.  The physician was similarly found to have violated the Civil Monetary Penalties Law by receiving additional payment for Medicare-covered services and agreed to pay $106,600 to resolve his liability.

As demonstrated by these settlements, violations of a physician’s assignment agreement results in substantial penalties and exclusion from Medicare and other Federal health care programs.  It would behoove a concierge physician to tailor contracts offered to Medicare patients.  Fees charged under such contracts should relate only to noncovered services and amenities.  For example, fees could relate to additional screenings by the concierge physician that are not covered by Medicare or amenities such as private waiting rooms.

According to the GAO’s 2005 Report on Concierge Care Characteristics and Considerations for Medicare, HHS OIG has not issued more detailed guidance on concierge care because its role is to carry out enforcement, not to make policy.  However, physicians with specific concerns regarding the structure of their concierge care agreements or practices may request an advisory opinion from HHS addressing their concerns.  Advisory opinions are legally binding on HHS and the party so long as the arrangement is consistent with the facts provided when seeking the opinion.

Next week, look for the release of Medical Marijuana 105, the fifth post in a series of posts discussing the current state of law in New York regarding medical marijuana.  To read the latest post in the series, Medical Marijuana 104:  Responsibilities of Health Insurers, click here.

This blog post is the third in a series of articles discussing the current state of the law in New York regarding medical marijuana. To read the latest post in the series, Medical Marijuana 102: NYS Registered Organizations and Dispensaries, click here.

In today’s post we’re going to be reviewing the requirements imposed by New York’s Medical Marijuana Program upon patients and certifying practitioners. As of August 22, 2017, 1,184 practitioners have registered with the NYS Department of Health (“DOH”) for the purpose of certifying patients for medical marijuana use and 28,077 patients have been certified for such use.

The DOH authorizes physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants to certify patients for medical marijuana use. As we mentioned in Medical Marijuana 101, New York’s Medical Marijuana Program is available only to patients who suffer from one of the following severe, debilitating or life-threatening conditions: cancer, positive status for HIV or AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, neuropathy, chronic pain, or Huntington’s disease. Patients must also have one of the following associated or complicating conditions: cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe or chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, or severe or persistent muscle spasms.

Practitioners who wish to certify patients to use medical marijuana must meet four general criteria. First, the practitioner must be qualified to treat patients who suffer from one or more of the serious conditions listed above.

Second, the practitioner must be either (1) a licensed physician who is in good standing as a physician and practicing medicine in New York State, (2) a certified nurse practitioner who is in good standing as a nurse practitioner and practicing in New York State, or (3) a licensed physician assistant who is in good standing as a physician assistant and practicing in New York State under the supervision of a physician registered with the New York State Medical Marijuana Program.

Third, the practitioner must have completed a four-hour course approved by the NYS Health Commissioner. The course must include the following course content: the pharmacology of marihuana; contraindications; side effects; adverse reactions; overdose prevention; drug interactions; dosing; routes of administration; risks and benefits; warnings and precautions; abuse and dependence; and such other components as determined by the commissioner. Currently the Commissioner has only approved two providers, TheAnswerPage and The Medical Cannabis Institute, to offer the course. The course is available to all interested parties, meaning that you can take the course even if you are not in the medical field and/or not looking to certify patients for medical marijuana use.

Lastly, the practitioner must have registered with the DOH. Practitioners can only register with the DOH if they’ve taken the four-hour course. Once a practitioner has completed the registration process they will then have access to the Medical Marijuana Data Management System which will allow them to issue certifications to qualifying patients.

Qualifying patients suffering from the severe illnesses listed above can learn more about whether medical marijuana may help them by speaking with a practitioner that is registered with the program. To help patients locate a registered practitioner, the DOH keeps an updated list of registered practitioners on its website.

Once patients are certified by a registered practitioner for medical marijuana use, patients must register with the DOH by, among other things, providing documentation to prove their identity and NYS residency. When patients register with the DOH they can also designate up to two caregivers. Those caregivers must also register with the DOH using the same online system as the one used by patients. Pursuant to the Compassionate Care Act there is a $50 application fee but the DOH is currently waiving the $50 fee for all patients and their designated caregivers.

Once a patient or caregiver’s registration is processed, the DOH mails a registry ID card directly to the patient or caregiver. Registrations expire when the certification that was issued by the practitioner expires. At this time, New York State does not accept certifications or registry ID cards from other states. This is not unusual as there are currently only three states (Nevada, Hawaii and Maine) that practice full reciprocity and will legally allow, under certain circumstances, out-of-state patients to make purchases at licensed dispensaries.

Now that we’ve learned about the basic regulations covering patients and practitioners we’re going to turn our attention to other important parties that play a role in the medical marijuana industry. Check back soon for Medical Marijuana 104: Responsibilities of Health Insurers. To be sure not to miss the article when it comes out, we invite you to subscribe to the Farrell Fritz New York Health Law Blog.

In follow-up to our prior blog post, Concierge Medicine – Is it for you?, we recognize that while a concierge or direct-pay practice might be a good choice for a physician or physician practice group, patients do not necessarily feel the same way.  When patients hear that a medical practice is a “concierge” or “direct-pay” practice, they often think of prohibitively high out of pocket costs.  One way for a concierge or direct-pay practice to be more enticing to patients is to structure its billing methods so patients may be able to obtain reimbursement from their health savings account (HSA) or flexible spending account (FSA) for some of the associated costs.  Generally, access fees will not be reimbursable through either a HSA or FSA.  But costs incurred for qualified medical services actually rendered to the patient may be.  Here are some quick rules of thumb for when HSA and/or FSA reimbursement may be applicable to cover such costs:

 

Fees for Qualified Medical Services:  Any fees charged for qualified medical care (generally defined under the Internal Revenue Code to include the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease) are generally reimbursable under a HSA or FSA, to the extent not reimbursed by the patient’s insurance.

 

Access Fees or Subscription Fees:  Fees related solely to having access to a physician will not be reimbursable under either a HSA or FSA.  This is because they are not fees for qualified medical services, but rather are more akin to insurance premiums (which are also not reimbursable under a HSA or FSA).  Such non-reimbursable fees would include fees for admission as a patient, monthly retainer fees, fees for a reduced wait time, fees for 24 hour access to a physician, or any other fees not directly related to the rendering of medical services.

 

Prepaid Fees for Qualified Medical Services:  If an access fee or subscription fee includes a prepaid fee for a qualified medical service (for example, the annual fee includes the cost of a comprehensive physical examination), any costs attributable to that medical service that are not reimbursed by insurance may be reimbursable under a HSA or FSA, but not until such time as the service is actually rendered to the patient.

 

In order for patients to be able to take advantage of reimbursement from their HSA or FSA, they must have appropriate supporting documentation for the qualified medical service.  Documentation should include the patient’s name, the date of service, the type of service, and the fair market value charge attributable to just the medical service portion of the patient’s bill.

 

In sum, concierge and direct-pay practices can work for physicians on account of the upfront fees paid by patients.  However, if such fees include prepayment for medical services, it will not only encourage patients to take advantage of preventative care but may also enable them to recoup part of their upfront costs from their HSA or FSA once such services have been rendered.

 

Next week, look for the release of Medical Marijuana 102, a follow-up blog post to Veronique Urban’s Medical Marijuana 101:  The State of the Law in NY.  This will be the second blog post in a series of articles discussing the current state of the law in New York regarding medical marijuana.

According to the 2016 Kaiser/HERT Employer Health Benefits Survey, the average annual premium for employer-sponsored family health insurance coverage in 2016 was $18,142 – representing a 20% increase since 2011 and a 58% increase since 2006.  As the cost of healthcare coverage has continued to rise dramatically, patients are seeing a reduced level of personal care.  The average wait to schedule an appointment with a doctor in the United States is 24 days – up 30% since 2014.  Meanwhile, physicians report that they spend, on average, only 13 to 24 minutes with a patient and of that time, approximately 37% of it is spent on EHR and other administrative tasks.

 

In 2010, the Affordable Care Act imposed a requirement that most Americans have insurance coverage.  But it also identified direct primary care as an acceptable option.  Whereas concierge and direct-pay medicine had once been limited to a very wealthy consumer base, it was suddenly poised to hit the mainstream.  And it can be a win-win for both physicians and consumers – physicians have the potential to devote more time to each patient and less time to paperwork, and consumers can pay for faster, more personalized attention from a physician instead of paying the pricey premiums now charged in the market for traditional insurance coverage.

 

But is concierge medicine right for every physician?

 

  1. Do you want to continue to participate in Medicare? If so, you will still be required to bill Medicare for your concierge patients and will not be able to charge Medicare patients extra for Medicare covered services.  Nor can you charge a membership fee (aka an access fee) that includes extra charges for services Medicare usually covers.  (The exception is if you do not accept assignment, in which case you can charge up to 15% more than the Medicare-approved amount for a Medicare covered services.)  If Medicare usually covers a service but will not pay for it, you must still provide the patient with an ABN.  And even if you do choose to opt out of Medicare, give extreme care to following the proper procedures or you could be subjected to substantial penalties.

 

  1. You still need to price services at fair market value. Even if you opt out of Medicare, providing “free” services because they are included in the access fee could run afoul of state anti-kickback laws.  Obtain advice regarding your state laws before setting your contract, and set a fair market value at which you provide each service.

 

  1. Check with your state to make your concierge/direct-pay contract is in compliance. Some states – including New York and New Jersey – have questioned whether these arrangements are deemed to be the practice of insurance but even where they are not, certain provisions of state insurance law could apply to your contract.

 

  1. Termination of existing patients. You can expect attrition by many, if not most, of your existing patients when transitioning from a traditional practice to a concierge or direct-pay model.  You will need to comply with state laws and ethical rules with regard to finding alternate care.

 

  1. Compliance with HIPAA. To the extent you are not participating in insurance or Medicare, you might not be a “covered entity” under HIPAA; however, there are many state privacy and confidentiality laws that you will still be required to comply with.

 

In some instances, transitioning to a concierge or direct-pay business model could be a win-win for both doctors and patients.  However, there are many legal issues that require careful consideration as you set up your practice.  There are many consulting firms that specialize in planning this transition, and a good attorney can help you avoid any pitfalls and ensure compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.

The Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MCFU) of the New York State Office of the Attorney General has recently issued restitution demand letters to providers for allegedly entering into percentage-based contracts with their billing agents. The MCFU letters cite the Medicaid Update March 2001, titled “A Message for Providers Using Service Agents as follows:

Billing agents are prohibited from charging Medicaid providers a percentage of the amount claimed or collected. In addition, such payment arraignments, when entered into by a physician, may violate the Education Law and State Education Department’s regulations on unlawful fee-splitting.

A physician will be guilty of misconduct if he or she permits:

any person to share in the fees for professional services, other than: a partner, employee, associate in a professional firm or corporation, professional subcontractor or consultant authorized to practice medicine, or a legally authorized trainee practicing under the supervision of a licensee. This prohibition shall include any arrangement or agreement whereby the amount received in payment for furnishing space, facilities, equipment or personnel services used by a licensee constitutes a percentage of, or is otherwise dependent upon, the income or receipts of the licensee from such practice, except as otherwise provided by law with respect to a facility licensed pursuant to article twenty-eight of the public health law or article thirteen of the mental hygiene law.

See Educ. Law §6530(19)*.

A physician is subject to professional misconduct charges if he or she has

directly or indirectly requested, received or participated in the division, transference, assignment, rebate, splitting, or refunding of a fee for, or has directly requested, received or profited by means of a credit or other valuable consideration as a commission, discount or gratuity, in connection with the furnishing of professional care or service . . .

See Educ. Law §6531.

The prohibition against fee-splitting is related to the state anti-kickback law which prohibits physicians from

[d]irectly or indirectly offering, giving, soliciting, or receiving or agreeing to receive, any fee or other consideration to or from a third party for the referral of a patient or in connection with the performance of professional services . . .

See Educ. Law §6530 (18).

Licensed professionals in New York State must review their contracts to verify that the compensation paid to their agents is not based on a percentage of fees for professional services.

*A similar rule applies to other licensed professionals. See N.Y. Rules of the Board of Regents §29.1(b)(4).

**In addition to the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute at 42 U.S.C. §1320a-7b(b), New York has enacted its own wide-reaching anti-kickback and anti-referral laws and regulations seeking to eliminate fraud and abuse in healthcare on a statewide basis. The state anti-kickback statue is set forth in the Social Services Law (See N.Y. Social Services Law § 366-d). The N.Y. Education Law addresses matters of professional misconduct rather than violations of fraud and abuse laws and regulations.

Consumers often seek online reviews of a business on platforms such as Yelp, CitySearch, Yahoo and Google Plus Pages before purchasing products or services. This includes patients seeking online reviews of a physician or other licensed professional before seeking treatment. Unfortunately, a practice known as “Astroturfing” has developed where businesses attempt to create an impression of widespread support for their services or products, where little such support exists. This practice is now occurring in the health care industry.

On December 2, 2016, New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman announced a $100,000 settlement with the urgent care medical service provider MedRite, LLC, d/b/a Medrite Urgent Care (“Medrite”). According to the announcement, Medrite paid thousands of dollars to internet advertising companies and freelance writers for positive reviews on consumer opinion websites. However, Medrite never required that reviewers visit a Medrite facility or experience Medrite’s services, and Medrite never disclosed that the reviewers were paid for the review.

The announcement cites New York Executive Law §63 (12) and the General Business Law §349 and 350 which prohibit misrepresentation and deceptive acts or practices in the conduct of any business. The announcement further cites the FTC “Guidelines on the use of endorsements and testimonials in advertising” (16 CFR Part 255) which state that it is a deceptive practice to solicit endorsement support for a product or service without disclosing material connections between the endorser and the advertiser sponsor. Medrite never disclosed that the reviewers were paid by the review. Under the settlement, Medrite is prohibited from falsely saying that someone promoting its services is an independent party and it cannot pay an endorser unless the payment is disclosed.